Thursday, 28 August 2014

Justice for abused children goes beyond race


As a mixed race child I am well aware of how race and ethnicity can be explosive issues. Race is often politicised for political gain but it appalls me that horrific child abuse predators were tolerated because of a fear that it would ignite racial tension in Rotherham. This country should learn to say it as it is, no more, no less. The problem in Rotherham did concern the attitudes of Asian men towards white girls, this is not to say that all child abuse is carried out only by Asian men. However, there is a problem with the attitudes of the Asian community. Women are treated as second class citizens and it is seen as shameful to have a female baby. The boys are brought up with a sense of entitlement and girls are taught that obedience is a virtue, this is evident with the sheer number of honor killings.

 Any girl who wasn't seen by these Asian men as conforming to their norm was seen as easy pickings. There is a tendency amongst the Asian community to brand Western culture as a corrupt culture. I write these things with trepidation because I do not want to raise the level of racism against the Asian community and I completely condemn any form of racism but race relations cannot be improved if the facts aren't confronted.

A huge problem is that children are not being believed and seem to have to overcome a very high barrier to be taken seriously. The girls and boys weren't believed because they were 'troubled and vulnerable.' This misogyny that is prevalent within institutions in authority is a tremendous barrier to justice for abused children. The distinction between 'good' and 'bad' children is a frightening discriminatory attitude and has no place in the world of children. 
SHARE:

No comments

Post a Comment

Blogger Template Created by pipdig